Hans van der Woerd
Thu 19 Nov ’20 20:15 uur

Camerata RCO

Camerata RCO - members of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Rolf Verbeek, conductor
Laetitia Gerards, soprano

Thu 19 Nov ’20
20:15 uur
  • Thu 19 Nov ’20
    20:15 uur
    Online

It's a hundred years ago that Arnold Schönberg commissioned Erwin Stein, his most important assistant at the Verein für musikalische Privataufführungen, to make an arrangement for small ensemble of his good friend Gustav Mahler's Symphony no. 4. When Schönberg gave his right hand this commission, his primary reason was to keep the music by one of the biggest examples and inspirations of the Second Viennese School in the spotlight.

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The Verein für musikalische Privataufführungen was founded in 1918 in Vienna. Schönberg's aim - followed by Alban Berg and Anton Webern, the other two members of the so called Second Viennese School -  was to primarily perform music by contemporary composers and present it to the audience in Vienna which was mainly conservative at heart.

Mahler had been a friend of Schönberg's from 1899 to his death in 1911, but his work was still far from the general recognition and appreciation is has nowadays. Mahler wrote the first three movements of his 4th symphony during the summers of 1899 and 1900. "I really only wanted to write a symphonic humoresque, but it somehow grew into a full-lenght symphony', he once said about about this work. It's true that there is a certain lightness to it - 'the basic atmosphere is blue, a heavenly blue' according to Mahler - but it also had an underlying and rather chilling plan...

The Camerata players gave a warm, glowing performance

New York Times

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